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To everything there is a season

By December 19, 2014 Photography No Comments

To everything there is a season, and with your camera there is hardly a better way to record and enjoy the change from winter to spring to summer to autumn, and back to winter again. But don’t take them for granted, either.

This was taken less than an hour after it started snowing, a short drive outside of town. Half an hour later the wind started blowing, ruining the soft, magical mood. 62-second exposure at ƒ/11 and ISO 400.

This was taken less than an hour after it started snowing, a short drive outside of town. Half an hour later the wind started blowing, ruining the soft, magical mood. 62-second exposure at ƒ/11 and ISO 400.

Every season has its own characteristics, some of which are fleeting and should be taken advantage of when the opportunity presents itself. You may notice how nice the autumn colours are when you’re driving to work, thinking ‘I’m going to get a picture of that,’ only to forget all about it. Then one day, you realise the leaves have all been blown away after a stormy night, and you’ll have to wait until the following year.

Blueberry bushes cover huge areas of the countryside in Iceland, turning a gorgeous bright red in late september.

Blueberry bushes cover huge areas of the countryside in Iceland, turning a gorgeous bright red in late september.

Similarly, you may be watching TV in your cozy living room and notice that it’s started to snow—big, soft, fluffy flakes that cover every tree branch, transforming the world outside into a strange, cottony landscape. It may be tempting to think that it’ll probably still be like that the next morning, but most likely it won’t. These are just two examples of seasonal opportunities that will only present themselves briefly, so go out there and take those pictures while you can.

Snow comes and goes; leaves come and go; the level of the lake rises and falls. These are things one doesn’t really notice unless it is captured in a series of photographs that can be viewed together.

Snow comes and goes; leaves come and go; the level of the lake rises and falls. These are things one doesn’t really notice unless it is captured in a series of photographs that can be viewed together.

If you have the presence of mind and the diligence, you might want to think about selecting one place to photograph periodically across the course of a year. It’s an intriguing exercise that allows you to see how much the images vary one from the other. Not only is it a beautiful study of nature and change, it allows you to test and experiment with different techniques required by different lighting and atmospheric conditions.

In Moodscapes Rebekka Guðleifsdóttir shares her unique approach to capturing breath-taking fine-art landscape shots. Her work has caught the eye of editors the world over, leading her to be named Web’s Top Photographer by the Wall Street Journal, and here she reveals the techniques that will make your landscape photography stand out from the crowd and win a place on a gallery wall.

BOOK NAME, AUTHORMoodscapes, by Rebekka Guðleifsdóttir
 
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